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The Brontë Sisters Collection - Wuthering Heights Jane Eyre Agnes Grey The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Shirley - cover

The Brontë Sisters Collection - Wuthering Heights Jane Eyre Agnes Grey The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Shirley

Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Anne Brontë

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

Five novels by the nineteenth-century literary sisters who “turned domestic constraints into grist for brilliant books” (The Atlantic).   This collection brings together five novels by Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë in one volume.  Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë: When a visitor arrives at a gloomy and isolated house in northern England, he discovers a story of passion, vengeance, and tragedy, in this gothic novel that shocked the readers of its day.  Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë: Revolutionary for its time, this Victorian novel is narrated by its titular character, telling the story of her childhood as an abused orphan, her school years, her time as a governess, and her simmering passion for the elusive Mr. Rochester.  Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë: This novel follows the experiences of a minister’s daughter who, when her family becomes impoverished, begins working as a governess, bringing her inside the homes of the English gentry, where she observes both material wealth and spiritual deprivation.  The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë: Helen Graham is known as the young widow who moved into a long-empty mansion with her son, took up an artistic career, and kept her distance from her neighbors. But readers of this classic, considered one of the earliest feminist novels, will discover there is more to Helen’s story.  Shirley by Charlotte Brontë: Set in a time of war, economic troubles, and the Luddites’ rebellion against the rise of machines, this is the story of two female friends: one a strong-willed heiress, the other an insecure girl abandoned by her mother.

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