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World Classics Library: H G Wells - The War of the Worlds The Invisible Man The First Men in the Moon The Time Machine - cover

World Classics Library: H G Wells - The War of the Worlds The Invisible Man The First Men in the Moon The Time Machine

Herbert George Wells

Publisher: Arcturus Publishing

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Summary

Dubbed the 'father of science fiction', H.G. Wells forged the path down which many have followed. This beautiful hardback compendium assembles four of his most iconic science fiction works: War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Time Machine. Whether concerning alien invasion, time travel or the risks of scientific development, these tales examine the potential futures of humanity which are at once thrilling and terrifying.ABOUT THE SERIES: The World Classics Library series gathers together the work of authors and philosophers whose ideas have stood the test of time. Perfect for bibliophiles, these gorgeous jacketed hardbacks are a wonderful addition to any bookshelf.

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